Let’s Talk Technical Careers

The Technicians Make it Happen website is a treasure trove of materials which can help bring the link between school subjects and possible careers, to life. Read on to explore the technician stories which can be used to link the careers and the curriculum, helping to fulfil Gatsby Benchmark 4.

GEOGRAPHY

Topic: climate change

Technical career to explore –Tom

 

Tom works in the Physical Geography department at the University of Manchester. His work examining prehistoric gnat heads extracted from amber, and sediment that has built up over 2000 years, helps to provide an accurate picture of how climate change happened in the past so we have the information to predict and tackle it in the future.

Read more, here

ART

Topic: design

Technical career to explore – Emily

 

Emily loved Maths and Art at school, so her current job as a Mechanical Designer is perfect for her. The UKAEA is a research organization working to develop a machine that will make energy from nuclear fusion, the process that fuels stars. If they are successful at recreating this reaction on earth, it would mean a carbon-free, boundless source of energy for mankind.

Emily’s skills come in use when creating 3D designs and technical drawings of the different engineering systems.

Hear more from her, here

SCIENCES: CHEMISTRY

Topic: healthcare

Technical career to explore – Dominika

 

As an Analytical Chemistry Technician, Dominika tests chemical compounds called radioactive tracers; ensuring that they are safe to be used on patients in research studies. “It’s really rewarding knowing that thanks to your work, patients receive safe treatments that will help to save lives in the long-run.”

Hear more about the challenges of working with tracers with a short shelf life, here

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

Topic: engineering

Technical career to explore – Jamie

 

As a Mechanical Engineering Technician, Jamie designs and builds parts that go into the 30ft tall ATLAS machine – a huge microscope which sits underground on the world’s most complex machine – the Large Hadron Collider. 

Hear more from him, here

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